On The Fence

A few years ago, we put in a split rail fence on one side of the driveway.  I spent most of that summer fussing over the landscaping along that fence line, planting flowers and edibles that would bloom throughout the growing season.
fence
The post holes were dug by hand, which is why we were on the fence (pun intended) about putting the fence up on the other side of the driveway that summer.  But, the time has come to complete this project and the weather is finally going to allow us to get busy. Unfortunately, the new fence will be dug by hand as well.  I keep telling my husband its good exercise.  🙂

After the fence is up, I’ll plant more flowers and edibles.  But first, we will put down some fabric to keep the weeds and grass at bay.  Last year, we planted hops vines in this area, so I’ll add flowering bulbs here with the intention of having some color most of the year along this part of the fence.  There will be a variety of lilies, some bleeding hearts and Hostas (because some of the area will be shady most of the day).  By the end of this weekend, the mulch will be added and I’ll be sitting on the porch enjoying the view of our completed project!

“Tough Jobs” Complete … CHECK

The last of our summer “Tough Jobs” is cleaning out the fence rows. It’s amazing how quickly they get out of control. One day the weeds are barely visible, the next they are knee high, then waist high.

Our thistle population is almost unbelievable. They have invaded the side pasture, the back pasture and the cattle runs near the barn. We’ve kept them in check in the big pastures with the Woods 12-foot Batwing and we got into some tight places amongst the trees with the Woods RC6 Rotary Cutter.

This weekend, we needed a combination of the Rotary Cutter, Mow’n Machine and some good old-fashioned shovel work.

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Finally after just a few hours of intense teamwork, the job was accomplished.

DSC00036To say “goodbye” to summer, we are hosting our club calf sale. Hopefully we’ll see many of these steer calves at the shows next summer. And, I’m sure we’ll have more tough jobs to tackle again next year. That’s one thing we always can count on, the farm jobs are never done.

steer 2014

End of Summer Jobs

As the summer is winding down and the kids are going back to school, we are all trying to cram in those last few projects. Tell us about the “Tough Jobs” you still need to tackle.

Tough jobs are easier with the right tools.

Mowing with the Woods Mow’n Machine is even fun.

Just submit the form below and we’ll try to feature them over the next few weeks. What a great way to help others learn from your experiences or gather suggestions on the best way to get those projects checked off your list.

“Tough Jobs” Checklist

Where has the summer gone!?!

With all the “Back to School” ads and deals, I know the days of my dedicated labor force are coming to an end. We’ve accomplished most of the tough jobs on the list, but some of the toughest are yet to come.

So far, we have repaired the driveway, rebuilt a fence, planted a neighbor’s food plots and reseeded a pasture area, mowed the grass, fence lines and front pasture and tilled the garden. We also freshened our flower beds, cleaned out and added pea gravel to the playground area and added a fire pit to the back yard.

I guess we’ve done better than I thought.

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Next we need to mow the pastures (again), clean out the cattle pens in preparation for our Fall Steer Sale, trim along all the fence lines and cut down the wild grape vines that would trap all the snow on our driveway this winter.

Next week we’ll be doing the State Fair circuit and then it’s the quick slide to fall. Be sure to post your “Tough Jobs” and visit us on Facebook to see more pictures and videos.

 

Things are looking up!

The corn is up. The fence is up. The kids are out of school. So, summer is officially here.

The fence is up and now the corn is up, too.

The fence is up and now the corn is up, too.

We are happy to report that the fence is finally done. We ended up with 1,075 feet of 5-strand barbed wire, 85 t-posts, 29 wooden posts and two metal gates.

That should keep the cows out of the corn this fall and keep the neighbors happy.

 

Putting in wooden posts is not our favorite job. We usually dig the holes by hand, drop the big, heavy post in the hole and then fill in around it.

Digging the last hole!

Digging the last hole!

This time we had the luxury of using the Woods PHD65 post hole digger with a 12-inch auger. It worked great! Each hole took just a few minutes to dig and even when we hit a rock, we could power right through. It was easy to attach and, with the parking stand, we could even be confident that is was secure when it was off the tractor.

As soon as the fence was finished we were able to let the cows out into the succulent, fresh grass. They were so excited they didn’t know where to start. I’m just happy they were able to get out in that pasture and we don’t have to worry about them escaping.

Enjoy, Girls!

Rolling hills and fresh grass. A smorgasbord for cows.

Rolling hills and fresh grass. A smorgasbord for cows.